How to Apply for a Working Holiday Visa in Berlin, Germany

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One of the most common stereotypes about Germany is the concept of “German efficiency”. While this is true in a lot of cases, there are some glaring exceptions – and few things are as slow and inefficient as the local bureaucracy. Add on the fact that Berlin is the most un-German city in Germany, and the end result is the absolute mess of an application process that new Berliners experience while applying for their Working Holiday Visa.

I personally went through this when moving to Berlin in July 2017. If it wasn’t for a few well-informed people that helped me out, I probably would have given up and settled elsewhere outside of the Schengen zone. Luckily for you, I’ve now put together all of my findings so that you don’t have to struggle (… as much). Trust me, Berlin’s worth it.

Also see: How to Apply for a Freelance Visa in Berlin, Germany

Note: there are some quick links in the sidebar that isn’t visible on mobile devices. For the full experience, be sure to check out this article on a larger screen.

Important Note: What’s Changed in 2019?

This guide has been updated on 16 September 2019, after learning that the visa application process has since changed. I hope this updated version helps with any confusion when you read older guides from before 2019.

Here’s a summary of what’s changed (or I’ve previously missed):

  • Previously, visa applicants used to get their Working Holiday Visa on the spot. Now, you’ll have wait about a month for your visa to be processed. In the meantime, you’ll receive a letter that states you are allowed to stay in Germany for this time. More on this below.
  • If you apply from outside of Germany, you get to skip the Anmeldung process, but you also are limited to working a maximum of 6 months at any employer. There are also some other pros and cons that are detailed below.

If you have any feedback or want to share your experience (which is greatly appreciated), simply head down to the comments section.

What is the Working Holiday Visa?

The “Working Holiday Visa Programme” is a bilateral agreement between Germany and a number of countries (Australia, Argentina, Chile, Israel, Japan and New Zealand). There are also similar arrangement with Canada (Youth Mobility Agreement) and South Korea (Working-Holiday-Agreement).

Update (10/12/2018): I’ve noticed that the list of countries has changed. Now, the Berlin website states “Foreign nationals from Australia, Israel, Japan, Canada and New Zealand may apply for this residence permit in Germany… Foreign nationals from Korean Republic may apply for this residence permit only in exceptional cases (see below) in Germany.”

All of these Working Holiday Visas are for twelve months, with the purpose of allowing young foreign nationals to experience German culture, travel freely and work within Germany. While there is no obligation to work, this visa gives you the option should you need it – or run out of money.

Popular alternatives to the Working Holiday Visa (or if you’re over 35 years old) are the Freelancer Visa, Artist Visa, Language Course Visa. For a quick guide to what conditions apply for your country’s passport, check out Project Visa.

Requirements for a Working Holiday Visa in Germany

To be eligible for the Working Holiday Visa, you must:

  • Be between 18 and 30 years of age inclusive (up to 35 if Canadian).
  • Be a citizen of one of the countries listed above.
  • Not be accompanied by dependent family members (e.g. children).
  • Have the equivalent of at least 2000 Euros in savings.
  • Have your main residence in Berlin (“Anmeldung” or rental agreement and written confirmation of occupancy from your landlord).

You must also have all the documents listed here.

For more information on the alternative to getting an Anmeldung for your visa, that same link has all the information you’ll need under “Proof of main residence in Berlin” and “More information”.

Demystifying the German Jargon

While going through this visa application process, there are a few words and phrases that you’ll often hear repeated. The most common ones will be Anmeldung, Bürgeramt, Ausländerbehörde, and the names of a few forms you’ll have to complete.

What is “Anmeldung” and “Bürgeramt”?

Anmeldung is the process of registering yourself to a German address. This is a requirement of your visa (unless you apply from outside of Germany). The Bürgeramt is the local office where you can submit your Anmeldung forms.

To complete your Anmeldung, you’ll need two forms: the “Anmeldung bei der Meldebehörde” is the application form to register yourself at your primary residence, while the “Einzugsbestätigung des Wohnungsgebers” is a form that your landlord – or main tenant – has to fill out to officially confirm that you now live at this address.

Both forms and more information can be found here (use Google Translate).

What is the “Ausländerbehörde”?

This is effectively the visa office that you’ll be dealing with. Here, you’ll need to bring the “Antrag auf Erteilung eines Aufenthaltstitels” form, otherwise known as the “Application for Issuance of a Residence Permit”.

The Ausländerbehörde is located at Keplerstraße 2, through the gate on the right hand side and around the corner to the left.

How to Apply for a Working Holiday Visa in Berlin

I went through this process with an Australian passport, but the information is relevant to most other countries that have a Working Holiday Visa agreement with Germany. The official website for more information can be found here.

Here the short version on applying for a Working Holiday Visa in Berlin:

  1. Book your Bürgeramt and Ausländerbehörde appointments as soon as possible.
  2. Arrive in Germany using the 90-day Schengen visa (no application required).
  3. Find a house, flat or shared flat, also known as a “WG” (or “Wohngemeinschaft”).
  4. Go to the Bürgeramt and complete your Anmeldung.
  5. Buy travel insurance for a year (more on this below).
  6. Go to the Ausländerbehörde and submit your visa application.

Confused? I know. Let’s break this down into parts.

Step 1: Book Your Appointments

There’s such a shortage of public service officers at the Bürgeramt, that you’ll have to book your appointment at least a month or two beforehand. The Ausländerbehörde is even worse – it’s booked out for years in advance (no, you didn’t read that wrong).

Book your Bürgeramt appointment using this link.

The best thing you can do is check the Ausländerbehörde website early in morning, every day, until you find someone who’s cancelled. Don’t be picky, just take any appointment that’s within your 90-day Schengen window.

Book your Ausländerbehörde appointment using this link.

Get your appointments booked as soon as possible – the earlier the better!

Step 2: Arrive in Berlin

A lot of countries have an agreement with Germany that allows them to stay for 90 days out of a 6-month period without a visa. Project Visa has some useful links that shows each country’s eligibility. If your country’s passport isn’t eligible for this, you won’t able to apply for any sort of Working Holiday Visa using the method on this page.

Step 3: Find Accommodation in Berlin

This can be tricky. The rental market in Berlin is so high in demand that most listings will get dozens, if not hundreds of applications – especially in the more desirable areas. An extra layer of difficulty with this is that you’ll need to sort out your Anmeldung, which a lot of temporary flats or sub-leases often can’t provide.

Still, it’s not impossible. Put some effort into your application, and show the landlord (or your future housemates) why you’d be a good fit.

You can find accommodation using a few methods:

Also, try and ask around. Similar to job openings, a lot of WGs and flats don’t get advertised due to referrals. Obviously, this can be difficult if you’ve just arrived, but it’s something to keep in mind as you start making friends.

Step 4: Go to the Bürgeramt (Anmeldung)

Don’t be late to your appointment! While the booking process is a mess, the appointments tend to start precisely on time.

If you haven’t managed to book your Bürgeramt appointment, you can try and find last minute cancellations, or simply go to your local office and wait in line. It’s very possible to get a Bürgeramt appointment on the day, just by turning up.

Something to keep in mind is that while most officials at the Bürgeramt speak perfect English, they’ll resent the fact that you don’t speak German. Bring all the documents you need already filled out, and be as nice as possible. If you can bring a friend that speaks German, you’ll have a much easier time here.

Step 5: Buy Travel Insurance

Of all of the required documents, the most confusing one is the “Foreign travellers’ health insurance that is valid for one year”. In the eyes of the German bureaucracy, not all travel insurances are created equal.

The easiest way to get around this is to purchase the widely-accepted “Student” package from Mawista. Don’t worry about the “Student” label – it also says “Work & Travel” which is what the Working Holiday Visa is meant to be.

It doesn’t provide great coverage, but it’s cheap, has a cancellation period, and ticks all of the bureaucracy boxes (it’s even advertised inside the Ausländerbehörde) – which means you can use it to apply for your visa with confidence and switch insurance providers afterwards. Most do. I recommend (and personally use) World Nomads.

One more tip: buy your insurance a few days before your appointment date, as it can take a day or two for the documents to arrive in your email inbox. I’ve had friends who have missed their appointments after getting their insurance at the last minute.

Step 6: Go to the Ausländerbehörde

If you’ve made an appointment, this bit is easy – it’s a simple matter of arriving on time.

But if you haven’t managed to make an appointment, the harsh reality is that you’ll have to get to the Ausländerbehörde around 3am in the morning, write down your name, and wait until they open. Arrive any later, and you probably won’t get in at all. Also worth noting is that the office is only open on Monday and Tuesdays from 7am, and on Thursdays from 10am.

Step by step, here’s what you need to do:

  1. Get to the Ausländerbehörde at 3am or earlier. Bring a jacket and some snacks.
  2. Someone will have a piece of paper with names on it. Write your name down, find somewhere to sit, and get comfortable. Make some friends if you can.
  3. In a few hours, someone will come around and start reading out names from the list. Line up as your name is called and you’ll get a ticket with your number.
  4. Around 7am, the doors will open and you’ll be able to go inside to the waiting room. Your ticket will be exchanged for another one.
  5. Wait.
  6. At some point, your number will be called out (probably in German, but someone should be able to translate). Line up at the visa office door and wait for your turn.
  7. Give your documents to the person behind the counter. Try and be as friendly as possible. If you speak German (or have a friend that does), that’s a plus.
  8. You’ll be asked to wait.
  9. Soon after, you’ll be given an official letter that states that your resident card will be ready in about a month, with an appointment date. It also states that you are allowed to stay in Germany until that date.

The visa application process used to end at #8, but this is no longer the case.

Step 7: Return to the Ausländerbehörde

If you’re within your 90-day Schengen visa exemption days, you can spend this waiting time by travelling for a while, otherwise just sit tight.

Technically speaking, you could travel inside Schengen during this time even if your Schengen days are finished. This is because the whole point of the Schengen agreement is that borders are open and unchecked. But technically,  again, you would be travelling illegally. All it takes is one overly curious police officer or for you to get into an accident to reveal that you’re not meant to be outside of Germany. All in all, I’d suggest holding back from booking any travel and just enjoy Berlin while you wait for your visa to be ready.

Head back to the Ausländerbehörde in time for your appointment, and you will receive your residency card. That’s it – you’re done! Buy yourself a celebratory beer from the nearest Späti.

Applying for Your WHV Visa from Outside of Germany

One of the most-asked questions from applicants is whether or not they should apply for their Working Holiday Visa after arriving in Germany or from abroad. Here are some pros and cons.

Applying from within Germany:

  • Pro: No limit to your Working Holiday Visa
  • Pro: Lower amount of funds required for your visa (unconfirmed)
  • Con: Getting Anmeldung can often be quite difficult, although you might be able to get around this by getting a rental agreement and written confirmation of occupancy from your landlord

Applying from elsewhere (home country or German embassy):

  • Pro: Anmeldung not necessary
  • Pro: Appointments are easier to come by
  • Con: Maximum of 6 months of employment at any company
  • Con: Higher amount of funds required for your visa (unconfirmed)
  • Con: Exit flight for your departure from Germany required (unconfirmed)

At the end of the day, it comes down to your personal preference and what you plan to do during your time in Germany.

If you’re Australian, you can only make this application from the German embassy in Sydney – however I’ve also heard of some people who have applied at their own state’s embassy (e.g. Melbourne), who then in turn sent the documents to Sydney. Unlike the Berlin website, the “Missions of the Federal Republic of Germany in Australia” website has some surprisingly helpful information about applying for the Working Holiday Visa from Australia.

If you’re already in Europe and have some time left during your 90-day Schengen Visa, you could even head to another country. One of the expats in the comments below successfully applied from Vienna, Austria.

With either of these methods, I’d suggest giving your local embassy a call first. Make sure that it’s possible to go through the application process from there before making the journey over. I would also say that generally calling is better than email, as they tend to take a while to reply.

You can find more information and a list of foreign German embassies here.

If you have your heart set on applying for your visa in Berlin, just try to get everything organised as early as possible. It’s not impossible, but 90 days is shorter than you might think – and you really don’t want to be panicking as your Schengen time ticks down.

One last thing: don’t forget to cancel your Mawista insurance after getting your visa and switch to World Nomads afterwards. I’ve heard of difficulties claiming through Mawista while there’s nothing but good reviews about World Nomads. All you need to do is simply email Mawista with your policy details and state that you would like to cancel.

Other Things to Consider

Once you’ve finished the stressful process of settling in, you’ll probably want to set up a bank account and phone number. As far as bank accounts go, all expats (and even many locals) unanimously recommend N26, an online bank with no account fees and free withdrawals. Their app is easy to use, and more importantly for expats: it’s the only real English banking option in Germany. If you need to convert currencies, TransferWise is the  fastest and cheapest option (by far!).

If you’d like learn more, have a look at my article where I explain the steps of setting up a bank account in Germany.

As for setting up a phone number, I’ve written guide on getting a SIM card in Germany. I’ve also written an article about various apps and services to help you navigate Berlin, mostly about the best ways of physically getting around. Although intended for tourists, the same services apply for those who have decided to make the move a bit more permanently. There are even a few referral codes in there to help you save a bit of cash. Let’s help each other out 🙂

If you’ve found any of my writing helpful, please be sure to link it to anyone you think might benefit from it.

That’s it. Welcome to Berlin and good luck!

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Chris LimPatrick`AR*ynAnna A.Jack Recent comment authors
Zach Greenwood
Guest
Zach Greenwood

Hi, thanks so much for the helpful article. I just had a question re: applying for visa outside of Germany..
So I am in Berlin right now on a 90 day tourist visa but due to difficulties getting Anmeldung, I am considering going and staying with a friend in Amsterdam and applying for my working visa from the German Consulate over there.. Is there any reason why this might not work?

Kim
Guest
Kim

@Zach
Hi guys!

Also having Anmeldung issues but am currently in Amsterdam, wondering if you applied in Amsterdam and if this method worked?

Thanks for the article, stressed Kiwi.

Brad Lindsay
Guest
Brad Lindsay

A lot of information I’ve seen on applying for a YMV always refer to Berlin as the city of choice, can this process be undertaken in any other city in Germany, for example Munich?

Billie
Guest
Billie

Hey Chris, Really helpful article and blog thankyou! Im currently planning on moving over to Berlin at the end of October this year on the WHS – leaving myself a bit of time to organise things, some people mention its fine applying in Berlin but others suggest to skip the hassle – apply here in Aus before i go. I know this isnt whay you did, but wondering if you had insight into this from talking to others? Or, given i have a bit of time up my sleeve to book appointments with the departments, if you think applying when… Read more »

Alex
Guest
Alex

This is super helpful! I’m going to be applying in a smaller town so luckily there aren’t any crazy waiting periods, my question is if the “Antrag auf Erteilung eines Aufenthaltstitels” is functionally the same as “Antrag auf Erteilung eines nationalen Visums”?

I’m still waiting to hear back from the Ausländerbehörde here (probably will have to end up calling them) about which is the right form, but I thought you might know.

Danni
Guest
Danni

Hi Chris, Thank you so much for taking the time to write this!! It was extremely helpful. I am planning to move to Berlin and July and stay for at least 9+ months. I currently live in Melbourne. I have one questions – What would be the absolute best way to apply for this working holiday visa from here? It is my understanding that the German embassy here in Melbourne have nothing to do with visas.. I am definitely up for a trip to Sydney if need be to lock everything in before I leave and avoid the headache. Apologies… Read more »

Olivia
Guest
Olivia

Hi Chris,
I’ve just purchased some Mawista insurance but I would like to cancel it after I receive my visa. How did you go about cancelling your insurance.

Thank,
Olivia

Dean Reading
Guest
Dean Reading

Has anyone recently gotten an appointment in Berlin at the Ausländerbehörde for the Working Holiday Visa? I’m currently in Berlin and need to get the visa, but when I try to book there are NO dates available (I checked up to 2023).
My partner needed an appointment for her freelance visa and got one in a couple of months.

Eli robson
Guest
Eli robson

Hey ya. Just letting you know that you technically dont need to register your address anymore as it states ‘Certificate of registration at the main residence or
Rental agreement and written confirmation of occupancy from the landlord’. The second option being much easier to obtain.
Also as an Australian you can stay in Germany an extra 90 days under the visa exempt agreement if you do use the original 90 days in shengen (it really does take that long sometimes!) There is not much info on this but you can email the german embasy to get proof.

Hope this helps

Alex Earnshaw
Guest
Alex Earnshaw

Great article Chris. Interesting about claim issues with “Mawista Student” though. There’s a passage in the eligibility section that seems to include working holiday participants – that is definitely worth pointing out if any further issues arise:

Ҥ 1 Who is eligible for insurance cover?
1. The following are eligible for insurance cover:
a) Residents of Germany who are travelling abroad as language
pupils, students, scholarship holders, candidates for a
doctor‘s degree, guest researchers, practical trainees, or who
are participating in „work- & holiday“-programs as well as
accompanying members of his or her family”

Lina
Guest
Lina

Hey Chris, I think you answered one of my questions on the Australians in Berlin facebook page too. Could be wrong! Anyway, I’m about to purchase my health insurance before going in (early af) to the visa office tomorrow. 1. Do you mean I can use World Nomads instead of Mawista to take as proof of health insurance to the visa registration office OR do you mean I have to use Mawista first (as cheap option) then ditch and change to World Nomads? What I’m asking is, can I just use World Nomads instead of any German health insurance like… Read more »

Aaron
Guest
Aaron

Update 01/10/2018: – Mawista student insurance was processed following next day (less then 24 hours). – I’m from NZ but live in Prague. – Booked appointment in Prague (showed them 9 days at a hostel in Berlin as proof of address). – Had to pay fees in Czech Crowns (2k / 75 euro) – At first they said I needed to go do this in Germany: As they can do the first part of the application, but I have to do the second part in Germany I think they meant the: (Anmeldung is the process of registering yourself to a… Read more »

Alec
Guest
Alec

Seconding Aaron’s comment, successful appointment in Prague. I also used Mawista. Some important info: 1) visa processing takes a week, minimum and you must collect your visa IN PERSON. This was slightly annoying as I’d been led to believe through other consulates that the visa could be mailed – my bad. 2) One night in a hostel in Dresden was sufficient for the initial proof of address bit on the form – just print out your booking confirmation. 3) Another thing that surprised me (that shouldn’t have in hindsight, given the same rules apply to Germans in Australia) is that… Read more »

Alec
Guest
Alec

You’re welcome Chris. Thanks again for this helpful article. I have a question that maybe you can help with(?) In terms of health insurance, my understanding is that German employers will pay your premiums. What I’m still unsure of is whether you select an insurer, or are automatically registered with one, when you commence work for the first time in Germany, or whether you are expected to arrange this yourself in advance, before commencing work? Although we’re not citizens/permanent residents (yet!), we’re still eligible for the public system right? I.e. we can ditch our private insurers (e.g. Mawista) once we’re… Read more »

Julia Moser
Guest
Julia Moser

Hi Alec,

Thanks for your comment – very helpful. With regards to the 6 month employment rule, are you aware of any restrictions to how much you can earn per month? I read 400 euros somewhere…which doesn’t really seem viable if I have to pay for rent too..but I just want to check. Thanks for your help!

Branden
Guest
Branden

Thanks for the advice! Just want to share that I applied for the insurance with MAWISTA and got all the documents in an email within 2 hours. That was a relief considering my visa appointment is in 2 days time.

Catherine Wu
Guest
Catherine Wu

Hi Chris,

Thank you for writing up all this info it has been super useful for my upcoming move. Quick question – when you entered Germany did you mention that you were entering to apply for the working holiday visa or did you just say tourism? I know as Australians we’re allowed to apply for the visa after entering, but just worried that mentioning anything remotely about working will cause issues at the border.

Thanks,
Catherine

Amy
Guest
Amy

Can anyone please tell me if I can bring my non EU husband with me to germany on yOUTH MOBILITY VISA . I am Canadian and he is from non Eu country .
I have been trying to get apointment for Auslanderhorde but it s booked up to 2023 .. so is it still posible to just show up there at 3 am and somehow get visa ?

Amy
Guest
Amy

Thank you soo much Chris Lim . I am so happY I found all this information at one place .

Liz
Guest
Liz

Hi Chris and the other posters who made an application in Europe but Germany: I find myself in the similar situation. I read this article, then I decided to apply for the visa while I am in Europe as Chris recommended. I successfully booked an appointment at the German Embassy in Vienna, but I am just wondering if I would have to flash an Austrian residence permit to get the German working holiday visa .. I noticed that the application form has a place where you have to fill in “Residence Permit No.” – I am not sure if it’s… Read more »

Liz
Guest
Liz

Hi Chris, thanks so much for the response. Yes I’m aware of that, the Japanese passport has 90 days visa free stay in the Schengen zone (FYI: the Japanese can stay in Austria for 6 months on a visa-on-arrival – this rule only applies to Austria not any other Schengen states, though). Actually I’m afraid I misunderstood your reply… So your point is that I could try applying for a German working holiday visa in Vienna, without having an Austrian residence permit? I have 6 months to try it in Austria? I know I should directly contact the German embassy… Read more »

Liz
Guest
Liz

Hi Chris! Thanks so much for the warm words and tips. The German Embassy in Vienna finally confirmed that, as you said, there is no requirement for having an Austrian residence permit (and that I can leave out the residence permit section in the application form!). They even stated that the appointment will be conducted either in German or English so no German is required too ???? Then at the end of the email they stated “further questions will not be answered” ???? I think I bombarded them with a lot of questions already (it already took +10 emails to… Read more »

Zeina
Guest
Zeina

Hi Chris, This article is amazing. In world where NO website gives you a straight answer about visas or immigration, this is so refreshing. I’m just wondering, I am an Australian applying for my German WH visa from Bern in Switzerland, and I’m wondering what I’ll need to provide at the meeting (I can’t get this info from them via email or phone) apart from the standard documents ie. my passport proof of funds 35mm x 45mm passport photo health insurance As far as I can tell in your article, I don’t need to prove any kind of residence or… Read more »

Zeina
Guest
Zeina

Okay, great! Thanks for getting back to me so fast.
Bern seems like a good option because they have many available appointments online, unlike most of the others that I’ve checked.

I’ll be applying on Monday so I’ll keep you posted.

One thing I forgot to ask – do you know how long these applications typically take from embassies outside Germany? And will they keep my passport in the meantime – and if they do, will they post it to me after?

Thanks!

Liz
Guest
Liz

Update 19 Mar 2019 – I GOT IT in Vienna, Austria 🙂 – The appointment was so easy that I was positively surprised at it… The officer only checked my documents and asked a few questions (e.g. what currency is in my bank statement), She also took my fingerprints. The whole thing took only 10 mins or less. I expected some sort of job interview questions but there were no such things. – The reception guy was so nice!! Once he knew I’m from Japan he spoke to me in all Japanese he knows 🙂 Although he did keep my… Read more »

India Armstrong
Guest
India Armstrong

Hello Chris,

I have a question about Mawista insurance. You suggested using the student package. Have you used this without being a student? I want to get the cheapest possible that I can cancel but I would hate to be in the visa appointment and then have them ask me questions about why I put I was a student. Ps. Im a 25 year old Australian who has just moved to Berlin to get the working visa!

Thanks for any help you can give and this article has been a life saver!

Liz K.
Guest
Liz K.

Hi Chris, a bit off topic but do you happen to offer services that help working holiday makers get a job in Berlin? If not, could you kindly recommend any company with that kind of service? I was considering using Nomaden Berlin but after consideration I just realised that this company is not the best choice for me to go for help,

Olga
Guest
Olga

Hi Chris, Thanks for the very useful info. I am a Canadian, about to apply for the Youth Mobility Visa in Berlin (my appointment is in 3 weeks). I have most of my documents ready but I have a few questions. First, in terms of proof of funds, I’ve read elsewhere that the printout of your online banking balance may not be sufficient but I opted out of banking statements (to save the trees) a while ago and that’s the only option I have right now (especially given that I can’t personally go to my bank as I’m here in… Read more »

Bronwyn
Guest
Bronwyn

Thanks so much to Liz above. I tried to book a Youth Mobility Agreement visa appointment at the Embassy in Warsaw, but it’s for Polish residents only (I’m Canadian). I can, however, book the YMA appointment in Vienna. Gott sei Dank!

Simon
Guest
Simon

Great article – I used your post & the comments when I was applying. However, just a few things to note in relation to Liz’s comments and applying abroad. I also applied abroad & a 6-month working restriction was put on my visa. After arriving in Berlin I realised I should have applied in Berlin (as everyone I spoke to who applied in Berlin didn’t have a working restriction on their visa) but I was worried about anmeldung so applied abroad. You need anmeldung anyway in order to get tax-ID & other admin tasks anyway. The 6-month working restriction has… Read more »

Jack
Guest
Jack

Hey – this is a great article, thanks so much! Just to confirm: if we apply for the Working Holiday Visa at the Ausländerbehörde in Berlin, is it processed straight away in the same appointment? The only appointment available for us is a few days before we head to the UK for a month, so we won’t be able to leave our passports there. We are NZ citizens, so if we are unable to get the WHV then, we will just apply from the embassy in London (thanks to the information in this article). Thanks!

Jack
Guest
Jack

Hi Chris. I just wanted to give a quick update on our experience getting the WHV. We had our appointment in Berlin at the Ausländerbehörde on Keplerstraße this morning. We followed the tips in your article and the application was accepted. However, at the end of the appointment we weren’t issued our Working Holiday Visa card (the officer referred to it as a 1-year residents card, but confirmed it was the WHV when we asked. It also seems like it’s a card, rather than a Visa stamp on your passport). Instead, we were given an official letter telling us we… Read more »

`AR*yn
Guest
`AR*yn

Hey Chris,
Thank you for such an important and helpful article.
im wondering if the travel insurance i got is “good enough”; i got it from my home country (~Israel) its for 2 years, covers me for about everything. i even flew back home just to get it for this visa!
But reading your article im feeling insecure about going there and getting turned down. is there any way of knowing what their standards are in advance?
thank you 🙂

Patrick
Guest
Patrick

Hi,
Mawista has 3 options for the student insurance available.
Which one should I choose?
– Student Classic
– Student Classic Plus
– Student Classic Comfort

Thank you.